ASCP Skin Deep

MAY | JUNE 2017

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www.ascpskincare.com 27 expertadvice FEED YOUR FACE Forever Young Slow the aging process with vitamin K by Alex Caspero The secret to antiaging may be in your refrigerator. Research shows that certain nutrients are essential for preventing and reversing many signs of skin aging, including fine lines, wrinkles, and dry skin. While these vitamins are often found in many topical creams and serums, it's still important to include a good source of them in your diet, as the antioxidant effect is most potent when ingested. Many of us are familiar with the benefits of biotin and vitamins E, C, and A, but what about vitamin K? This underappreciated nutrient may be key in maintaining skin elasticity and preventing wrinkles. 1 Vitamin K, found in leafy green vegetables and fermented foods, helps prevent the calcification of arteries, veins, and soft tissue. This effect is why vitamin K may help protect the body against Alzheimer's disease, varicose veins, and heart disease. In the skin, this mechanism helps prevent wrinkles and helps keep skin supple and smooth. Vitamin K is also effective in reducing stretch marks, dark spots, and scars. While other fat-soluble nutrients (vitamins A, D, and E) are stored in the body, vitamin K is needed on a daily basis. Plant foods can provide us with a significant amount of vitamin K, especially kale, spinach, beet greens, Swiss chard, and Brussels sprouts. If you are looking for another reason to eat your greens, this is it. Vitamin K is typically safe for all individuals, but those who are on blood-thinning medications should discuss recommended amounts of vitamin K with their medical team, as these types of drugs can be affected by the nutrient. Note 1. D. Gheduzzi et al., "Vitamin K's Anti-Wrinkle Actions," Laboratory Investigation 87, no. 10 (October 2007): 998–1,008. Plant foods can provide us with a significant amount of vitamin K, especially kale, spinach, beet greens, Swiss chard, and Brussels sprouts.

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