ASCP Skin Deep

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

Issue link: http://www.ascpskindeepdigital.com/i/762312

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 33 of 70

www.ascpskincare.com 31 expertadvice MIND YOUR BUSINESS Jane, Can We Talk? A rally cry for my professional colleagues coping with no-shows by Lori Crete A few months ago, I had a very unusual week: five hours of no-shows! And one of them (let's call her "Jane") really got under my skin in a big way. Jane is a local beauty school instructor— someone who clearly knows better— and this was her second no-show. Her actions demonstrate to me that she does not respect the very boundaries she should be teaching her students to create and uphold in their businesses. My week of no-shows, combined with the struggles I see all of us dealing with on a daily basis, triggered me to write this hypothetical letter to Jane and clients of her ilk when booking with a beauty professional. This letter is not meant to be sent to clients; I wrote it out during a moment of frustration. I bet you feel like this sometimes, too. 3 Steps to Prevent No-Shows 1. At their fi rst visit, make sure clients know and sign your no-show policy. (You have one, right?) 2. Have a reminder system for clients, such as calling or texting a day or two before. Include your no-show language: "Remember that I require a 24-hour notice for cancellations. Missed appointments will be charged." 3. Follow through with your no-show policy. Determine the exceptions you will allow (no one wants a sick client coming in for their appointment), but stick to your guns. Dear Jane, I'm happy to say this letter is not meant for the 80 percent of clients who visit estheticians, hair stylists, nail techs, and massage therapists every four to six weeks. This message is meant for the 20 percent who need a gentle reminder— or a new awareness—surrounding a dilemma that directly aff ects an industry of professionals committed to helping you look and feel your beautiful best. Before I jump into the dilemma, let me give a big heartfelt thank-you to the 80 percent. These are the clients who view us as the professionals we are; who commit to the appointments they make, arrive on time, and never no-show, and we thank them from the bottom of our hearts. These 80 percent are not only the reason we love what we do, they are the reason we can pay our bills, support our families, and keep our business doors open. Now, for the other 20 percent, let's talk. To those who minimize, or worse yet, completely disregard our policies, you need to understand what happens when you miss an appointment without notifi cation: your practitioner does not get paid. Most beauty professionals only get paid for services rendered. Before skipping an appointment without canceling, consider how you would feel if you showed up at work and your boss informed you that they were going to deduct hours off your pay each week because they felt like it. That's exactly what happens when you no-show: you take money away from the practitioner. Your appointment time is reserved for only you. The business can't "sell" that time to someone else if they don't know in advance you aren't going to be there. If you will kindly give your practitioner a 24-hour cancellation notice, they can usually fi ll the spot and everyone wins. If you run late, it means you will lose out on part of your investment because your practitioner is forced to rush. That results in lower quality of work than if you had been on time, and the practitioner feels bad, too. No one wins. I will conclude by saying beauty professionals understand that clients are human, too, and we all make mistakes. We know emergencies happen. We are always willing to work to create win-win situations and even give a free pass when it's the right thing to do for loyal clients who encounter the rare situation that prevents them from being able to make it in. Thank you for respecting our policies and allowing us to be professionals who are grateful for the opportunity to earn your business. All my love, Lori

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of ASCP Skin Deep - JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017