ASCP Skin Deep

NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2021

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40 ASCP Skin Deep November/December 2021 other light energy sources can be used to activate the photosensitizer, including pulsed dye laser, infrared light, or even sunlight. 7 Traditionally, this treatment has been used to kill pre-cancer and cancer cells on the surface of the skin, but recently PDT has become a popular off -label treatment for acne and acne rosacea. 8 Studies have shown that PDT leads to a sustained reduction in acne lesions, a decrease in C. acnes proliferation, and a signifi cant reduction in the size of sebaceous glands. 9 Another added benefi t is that it does not involve the use of oral medications, such as antibiotics or isotretinoin. While PDT involves the use of a topical drug, this treatment may be performed by estheticians in a medical setting under the direction of a medical director. Check with your state board before performing this procedure, and be sure you have the proper training and medical director oversight. INTENSE PULSED LIGHT AND BROAD BAND LIGHT Intense pulsed light (IPL) is a pulsed light therapy that utilizes a range of light waves to target a wide variety of conditions, some of which include rosacea, erythema, hormonal pigmentation, age spots, and postinfl ammatory pigmentation. IPL is best suited for treating red and brown pigments in the skin and can treat discoloration from acne, 10 although it is not an eff ective treatment for targeting active, ongoing acne lesions. For clients who suff er from atrophic scarring, IPL may also aid in softening the scars by increasing collagen production. Broad band light (BBL) is the latest form of IPL technology that uses several diff erent wavelengths of light to target the bacteria and infl ammation in active acne lesions. It begins by treating the skin with blue BBL light, known to eliminate C. acnes bacteria in the follicle and sebaceous gland. The treatment is then followed by red and/or yellow BBL light that eliminates infl ammation and reduces the production of sebum. 11 Each state has its own rules and regulations as to whether an esthetician can perform IPL treatments—either under the delegation of a physician or at all. If IPL is within your state scope of practice, additional training is not hard to fi nd. Be sure your training program provides a minimum of 30 hours, includes theory and hands-on training, and results in a certifi cate of completion. Notes 1. EstheticianEDU.org, "Everything You Need to Know about Off ering LED Light Treatment in your Esthetics Practice," accessed August 10, 2021, www.estheticianedu.org/ led-light-treatment. 2. Jayne Leonard, "The Benefi ts and Side Eff ects of Blue Light Treatment for Acne," Medical News Today, September 3, 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319254. Liability Insurance Professional liability insurance for laser and light energy procedures protects you in case a client sues. ASCP members have access to optional Advanced Esthetics Insurance coverage that protects you and your esthetics practice if you perform IPL, BBL, or other advanced modalities like radio frequency or cryotherapy. More information about advanced esthetics coverage, including the steps for applying, is available at ascpskincare.com/ami. Pricing for laser and light energy procedures ranges from $1,161 to $1,403 for the year, and you can bundle that coverage with other advanced modalities to save more. If you can answer yes to the following three questions, you may be eligible for this advanced esthetics coverage: • Do I have proof of advanced training with hands-on experience? • Am I practicing these modalities within the scope of practice authorized by the state in which I work? • Am I an ASCP member, or do I plan to be? Learn more about ASCP's Advanced Esthetics Insurance program for members at ascpskincare.com/ami. ADVANCED MODALITIES CHECK OUT THIS LIGHT THERAPY VIDEO 1. Open your camera 2. Scan the code 3. Tap on notifi cation 4. Enjoy! 3. Randie H. Kim and April W. Armstrong, "Current State of Acne Treatment: Highlighting Lasers, Photodynamic Therapy, and Chemical Peels," Dermatology Online Journal 17, no. 3: 2, https://doi.org/10.5070/D30t40h9px. 4. Randie H. Kim and April W. Armstrong, "Current State of Acne Treatment: Highlighting Lasers, Photodynamic Therapy, and Chemical Peels." 5. Jayne Leonard, "The Benefi ts and Side Eff ects of Blue Light Treatment for Acne." 6. EstheticianEDU.org, "Everything You Need to Know about Off ering LED Light Treatment in your Esthetics Practice." 7. Marilyn T. Wan and Jennifer Y. Lin, "Current Evidence and Applications of Photodynamic Therapy in Dermatology," Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology 7: 145–63, https://doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S35334. 8. Marilyn T. Wan and Jennifer Y. Lin, "Current Evidence and Applications of Photodynamic Therapy in Dermatology." 9. Randie H. Kim and April W. Armstrong, "Current State of Acne Treatment: Highlighting Lasers, Photodynamic Therapy, and Chemical Peels." 10. University of Utah Health, "What is IPL and How Does It Beautify Skin?," Health Feed Blog, October 30, 2019, https:// healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed/postings/2019/10/ipl.php. 11. Sciton.com, "Forever Clear BBL," accessed August 10, 2021, www.sciton.com/physicians/forever-clear-bbl.

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