ASCP Skin Deep

MAY | JUNE 2021

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34 ASCP Skin Deep May/June 2021 Receptor Postsynaptic receiving neuron Presynaptic sending neuron Cannabigerol (CBG) Brain CMS Spinal Cord CB1 receptors are primarily found in the brain and central nervous system. CB2 receptors are mostly in the peripheral organs, especially cells associated with the immune system. Thyroid Upper Airways Liver Adrenals Testes Bone Prostate Uterus Ovaries Skin Gastrointestinal Tract Heart Eye Lymphatic and Immune System Tetrahydrocannabinol Cannabinoid receptor Cannabinoids Neurotransmitters Lipid precursors Receptors CB1 CB2 HO OH Endocannabinoid System SKIN CARE BENEFITS A 2019 article published in Molecules Journal of Chemistry, "Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the 'C(ut) annabinoid' System," states that "several lines of evidence demonstrate that both endogenous and phytocannabinoids can exert various biological e ects in the skin, implicating cannabinoid signaling as a key contributor to cutaneous homeostasis." 1 CBG is a phytocannabinoid that works with the skin to encourage balance. Though there are minimal studies on CBG alone, this review includes several studies that hold promising indications for CBG in uence on signaling the ECS, as well as instigating the body's natural endocannabinoid production. CBG does not induce an intoxicating response in the body like its cousin THC, and topical application communicates vastly di erent e ects than ingestion. The inclusion of cannabinoids alone doesn't make a product or service amazing; they must be in a properly formulated product to be e ective. DIY RESEARCH Keep a discerning mindset when exploring the use of CBG. When looking to add it to an infused product, keep in mind the product's intention and formulation. With CBG showing promise for dry skin (by increasing sebum production), a product designed to treat acne that includes CBG may prove to be a novelty rather than functional. (But while we're here, because CBD regulates sebum production and has powerful anti- in ammatory e ects, an acne product that contains CBD could be incredibly bene cial.) An e ective CBG-infused product will likely carry the most bene t if it is accompanied by other cannabinoids with the intention of addressing dry, sensitive, or compromised skin. With the most current data concerning the e cacy of CBG coming from anecdotal evidence over research, relying on actual product experience may prove to be the greatest evidence. That said, science is moving quickly from in vitro to in vivo studies. With the emerging popularity of CBG, we can expect to have a greater clinical understanding of many other topical bene ts soon (in the next ve years). Until then, keep an open mind, and don't be afraid to try before you buy! Note 1. Kinga Fanni Tóth et al., "Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the 'C(ut)annabinoid' System," Molecules 24, no. 5 (March 2019): 918, https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24050918. INGREDIENTS Receptor Presynaptic sending neuron Cannabigerol (CBG) Brain CMS Spinal Cord CB1 receptors are primarily found in the brain and central nervous system. CB2 receptors are mostly in the peripheral organs, especially cells associated with the immune system. Thyroid Upper Airways Liver Adrenals Testes Bone Prostate Uterus Ovaries Skin Gastrointestinal Tract Heart Eye Lymphatic and Immune System Tetrahydrocannabinol Cannabinoid Cannabinoids Neurotransmitters CB1 CB2 HO OH Endocannabinoid System

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