ASCP Skin Deep

MAY | JUNE 2019

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ascp now offers advanced modality insurance! ascpskincare.com/ami 33 Alleviating Acne Treatment techniques to manage acne-prone skin by Mark Lees, PhD In the last issue of ASCP Skin Deep, we discussed the basic causation factors of acne and congested skin. In this issue, we will discuss effective concepts in treating acne-prone skin. THE OBJECTIVE The objective in treating acne is to clear the follicles (pores) and prevent their infl ammation. If the follicles are clear and calm, the follicles can naturally aerate, which fl ushes the follicles with oxygen— keeping P. acnes bacteria in check and preventing further infl ammation. TOPICAL TECHNIQUES The best technique to clear follicles is the use of topical agents that either loosen the dead cell buildup in the follicles or cause the breakdown of these dead cells. Examples of these agents are benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, alpha hydroxy acids (such as glycolic and mandelic acids), and sulfur. These agents normally are in a gel-based vehicle to be applied to the aff ected skin areas at night. • Daily use of one or more of these agents in acne-prone or clogged congested areas will break up this debris and clear the follicles. Which ingredient is the best? That depends on the severity and type of acne condition your client has. Salicylic acid and glycolic acid are very helpful for clogged pores and congestion, as these agents break up dead cell buildup in the follicle and on the skin's surface. • Benzoyl peroxide, which can be used in diff erent concentrations, helps clear impactions and also kills acne bacteria by fl ushing the follicles with oxygen. Benzoyl peroxide is a good choice if the client has frequent or numerous papules and pustules. • Sulfur, mixed with resorcinol, makes a great spot treatment for adult acne issues. Sulfur is antibacterial and helps reduce swelling in raised pimples. Remember, acne-prone and congested skin is genetic, and cell buildup will recur if treatment is stopped. expertadvice SKIN SOLUTIONS

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